Navigating the business end of the music business

music business adviceIt’s called the music business for a reason — yet for many indie artists, organizing and maintaining the business end of a music career can rank just above dental surgery when it comes to activities of choice. It doesn’t have to be that way. Following just a handful of straightforward suggestions will streamline your music business existence and help you avoid common financial pitfalls that can eat up precious hours and energy. Read More.

How to create a compelling Facebook ad

compelling Facebook adEven though lots of indie artists are satisfied staying independent, many musicians I meet would like to get noticed by a label. Personally I don’t focus too much on “label obsessed” marketing, so you can use this same trick to reach journalists, radio stations, bloggers, and all manner of influential people who can help push your music forward. Read More.

Give fans more reasons to buy your music

How to sell more musicIn a world driven by social media, fans want to know what you’re up to, what you did today, and what you were thinking about when you wrote the lyrics to your latest single. In the new industry, this is where much of the value lies. Fans don’t need more ways to buy new music; they need more reasons to. Give them an invitation into the journey and you’d better believe they’ll pay to gain that kind of access. Read more.

Gigging, touring, and performance contract tips

Performance contract adviceThe great drummer Art Blakey once said, “If you’re not appearing, you’re disappearing.” That’s the bottom line. The way the music business is structured, the live end is all-important to most artists. The talent buyers at venues are in the business of booking talent. Ideally, artists go through dedicated booking agents. That is the goal then, to ultimately attract a booking agent to represent you. Read more.

Celebrate Success – Press Releases, Artist Bios, and PR for Indie Artists

As I take people through the challenging self-discovery process, I’ve realized that a lot of indie music artists, at all stages of their careers, share a common issue: they are reluctant to celebrate success. They often feel uncomfortable announcing even the major milestones – like EP releases, show and tour announcements, notable press interviews – that are the product of their hard work, growth, and development. Read more.