Butch Vig on record production

Butch Vig on record productionButch Vig is synonymous with the sound and legacy of alternative rock. His work with Nirvana, Sonic Youth, and Smashing Pumpkins rewrote the rulebook for guitar-centric rock production. Vig sat down with iZotope to talk about his creative process, production philosophy, and his affection for iZotope’s Trash plug-in. Read more.

Audio mastering for vinyl

If the music program is sibilant overall, the audio can be cut at a lower amplitude, which can help with the distortion caused by the high frequency information. The result, though, is a vinyl record that’s at a lower level, and the surface noise will be more prominent – not to mention, it’s not going to be comparable to other vinyl albums. Read more.

(Irreverent) Recording tips from Mitch Easter

Mitch Easter Recording TipsI have sort of an irreverent attitude, so I’ve been inclined to do things that were supposed to be wrong. I always like using cheap or ancient, wheezing gear along with the usual pro gear, because I really think the “action” sound comes from musically effective distortion. Sometimes this oddball gear makes a bold sonic statement you just can’t get any other way. I like tape delays, for instance a [Roland] Space Echo, especially if the tape has a little crease in it. Read More.

subtractive equalization

Don’t boost – reduce! Subtractive equalization and your home studio mix

Equalization is one of the most powerful tools an audio engineer can get their hands on. Unfortunately, some beginners and home studio users habitually reach for it without understanding what it can do to a mix. To avoid a gain staging dilemma, apply subtractive equalization to your mix. Instead of boosting your favorite signals, try limiting yourself to cutting. We can call this concept “carving.” Read more.

Home Studio Recording Tips From a Pro Studio

HeadphonesEchoes talks with producer/engineer/studio owner Drew Raison for insights on how to make your home recordings sound better. Drew says, “When you’re working in a home studio, I recommend you keep it simple. Minimal equalization and minimal compression at the time of recording, because you can add that later. You can’t always undo, so try not to make unfortunate decisions at the time of recording. Read more.

How To Record a Bass Drum in Your Home Studio

I’ve had drummers who won’t take off their front head, and refuse to cut a hole in the front head. I’ve had to work with that. They had gotten the tuning to sound amazing, or they were purists and didn’t want anything inside the drum. The biggest issue you have when you don’t have the mic in the drum is you’re going to get bleed – bleed from the cymbals, and from the other drums – which can be a real problem for the kick, because it’s driving the entire song, and a lot of times when you’re mixing you want to gate your kick and snare. Read more.

How To Record a Snare Drum in Your Home Studio

I want to hear a combination of the drum – the hit of the drum – and the snares almost equally as loud as the drum. In a standard 4/4 set up, you’re hearing the snare on the 2 and 4. That snare has a space to fill – it’s the answer to the space the kick drum is filling on the 1 and 3. The snare and the kick have to work together to pull the song forward. If you have a great kick sound, and the snare isn’t matching it, you’ll have this imbalance. Read more.