From mastering audio to manufacturing: the steps in CD production

Audio Mastering GuideThe process of transforming your musical ideas into a finished product you can share and sell begins with your audio recording sessions and continues through to the delivery of your packaged CDs or vinyl records. The choices you make at each step affect the quality of your final product, so familiarizing yourself with this process at the earliest stages will help you produce the best possible results. Read more.

Format options for your audio master

audio master formatsWhen deciding how to prepare and submit your audio master for CD manufacturing, there are several format options to choose from. A complete body of work on a CD-R, individual audio files such as WAV or AIFF (with any variety of bit-depths and sample rates), and DDP 2.0 file sets are the most popular formats. An analog reel to reel master or DAT (digital audio tape) also provides high quality, though used less frequently with the advent of newer digital options. Read more.

Audio repair and restoration: tools of the trade

Audio repair and restoration with RX 3 When you hear the words “repair” and “restoration,” you might be inclined to think of dusty vaults filled with aging master tapes and records. Some audio repair and restoration projects involve taking old recordings and reviving them, and the same methods and tools used for those projects can be used for a wide range of scenarios. Every time you record audio, there’s always the chance of encountering unexpected and unwelcome audio “guests.” Read more.

Dithering – adding “good noise” to improve your home recordings

DitheringWhat is dithering?
In your English class, to "dither" means to act nervously or indecisively. When we’re talking about digital audio and home studio recording, dithering is the process of adding noise to the audio signal. Adding noise, you say? Why would you want add noise? Basically, it’s a trade — low-level hiss in exchange for a reduction in distortion when you convert 24 bit to 16 bit audio to transfer to a CD. Read more.

Licensing FAQ – presented by Disc Makers and Limelight

Any time you reproduce and distribute a recording of a composition you did not write – and that is not in the public domain – you need a mechanical license. Mechanical licenses are issued by the owner or controller of the composition, typically publishers, acting on behalf of songwriters or composers. Basically, this is a royalty payment to the songwriter (or more correctly, the copyright owner) for allowing you the use of the composition. Read more…