Avoiding common songwriting obstacles

Songwriting tips from Ben CampIn Part 2 of our interview, songwriter Ben Camp shares his perspectives on the art and craft of songwriting, including methods he uses to develop compelling song ideas. He expands on his thoughts about the importance of co-writing and why he believes it’s essential to build a network of talented collaborators while pointing out some of the common mistakes aspiring songwriters often make. Read more.

The road to becoming a successful songwriter

Successful songwriter Ben CampBen Camp interview, Part 1. “Doubt is part of the creative process. Even people who are at the top of the songwriting game today struggle with the process. [One hit songwriter I know] has said that he’ll come up with 100 different melodies to find the one that sticks. So it’s essential to not be afraid to throw out those hundred until you hit on one that lights you up on the inside and you know, ‘Wow, that’s it!’” Read more.

Writing, recording, and performing children’s music

Gasoi on writing children's musicWhen you’re set to start writing children’s music of your own, Gasoi recommends a little introspection. “Find that place within yourself that reminds you of your own childhood, that place of innocence, fun, and abandonment. Tap into happy memories from your own childhood, things that bring out that fun and exuberance. Regardless of the style of song, bring a joyful spirit to what you do.” Read more.

Ask a songwriter: 5 questions for Five For Fighting’s John Ondrasik

Songwriting tips from John OndrasikFive For Fighting’s John Ondrasik exploded onto the music scene with the release of “Superman” in 2000. Having written thousands of songs in his youth, the public adoration of “Superman” stunned his mother – a way to actually make money songwriting and playing music! Ondrasik’s father was less surprised, recognizing he had dedicated 45,000 hours into honing his craft. Read more.

mixing hip hop vocals

Producing great hip hop vocals

One of the biggest mistakes I see in the studio is checking the mic with the artist behind it. It takes them out of the zone. I’ve seen engineers do it dozens of times and I see the look on the artist’s face when it’s happening. When the artist sets up behind the mic, he or she either has the mindset of being ready to give a great performance – or is scared to death and doesn’t need anything else throwing him or her off. Read more.