How to submit your songs to music blogs, record labels, radio, and press

by David Wimble on June 7, 2013 · 53 comments

in Business Forum,Fast Forward,Promotion

Music blogs and record labels have specific guidelines on how to submit – and how NOT to submit – your music

Music blogs submission guidelines

As the publisher of the Indie Bible and the Indie Venue Bible, the most frequent question I get from artists is, “How do I contact the music services listed in your directory?” The answer is always the same: Whether you’re contacting magazines, music blogs, radio shows, record labels, music distributors, or promotional services, you have to check THEIR SPECIFIC submission guidelines before getting in touch.

This is the most fundamental rule of promotion. It is the rule now, and it will be the rule 2,000 years from now when humans have giant heads and tiny bodies.

There’s really no excuse not to check. Ninety percent of music services have their submission guidelines clearly posted online.

Why do artists ignore submission guidelines?

My guess is, as is the case with most people, musicians and artists are in a gigantic hurry and are always on the lookout for any available shortcut. It’s a habit that lies deep within our psyche and is hard to break.

Shortcuts are great when you end up where you’re trying to get to. If you don’t end up at your destination, then by definition, it’s not really a shortcut.

In the music business, because there are so many thousands of people submitting their music daily, if you don’t follow the submission guidelines, you may as well open your window and throw your CD onto the street. That way, it has a miniscule chance of someone listening to it.

It used to be when you were looking for places to review or play your music, the options were very limited. You would make a demo in a studio or create a home recording, and would then mail physical copies to the various record labels. There were some college stations around that would play your song, and a cluster of homemade zines, but that was it as far as any exposure opportunities went. Remember, there was no internet back then.

However, that was many years ago.

With the introduction of the internet and all of its components – including audio and video websites, music blogs, review websites, internet radio, podcasts, and social networking systems – it is no longer possible to even keep track of all the places that could help you to gain exposure for your music. And they all have their own special way that they like to be reached.

Yet, whether they have been around long enough to witness this change or have grown up with the internet as a fixture, a lot of artists still tend toward a one-size-fits-all mentality when it comes to making initial contact. They believe that it’s more practical than taking the time to research each music service individually.

But if it doesn’t get you anywhere, how practical is it?

How to submit your music

The remainder of this article explores all the possible ways (that I know of) to submit your music to the various music services (or in some cases, reasons why a music service doesn’t want your submission).

I have created this list to show you that there are MANY ways that you may be asked to submit your music. I hope to get the point across that sending your music without checking the submission guidelines is a waste of your time and money. And frankly, it just irritates people.

How to guarantee failure

  1. The generic email blast. We all know this one. We’re all subjected to it daily. It’s called SPAM. The logic behind it all comes down to basic math. “If I send out X number of emails, and only .01% of the people respond, that’s still a lot of responses!”

    I can guarantee you that no music submission guidelines in the history of the world have ever stated that their preferred way of being contacted is by an email blast!

  2. The generic email blast with fries. To get an e-blast from an artist that has cc’d you and several hundred other people is the lowest possible form of communication in the music business, especially if there are MP3s attached. It frustrates everyone involved. If you’re going to send out a blast, at least have the decency to use the blind carbon copy (bcc:) so that no one sees anyone else’s email address.

  3. No contact name. When sending an initial email to a music service, I highly recommend that you take the time to find out the name of the appropriate contact. This will show them that you have sacrificed a few seconds of your time to at least find out who to contact.

    These are human beings you’re contacting, and it frustrates them to continually receive requests from people that call them “Hey” or “Dear Music Reviewer.”

    There are cases where no contact name is available. A lot of bloggers like to keep things mysterious. In these cases you have no choice but to start your correspondence with a generic salutation. However, in most cases, the name of the appropriate contact is posted, usually in the “About Us” or “Contact” section.

  4. Sending unsolicited material. One of the most frustrating things for independent artists to deal with is the large number of labels and music services that do not accept unsolicited material. It creates a kind of an outside-looking-in feeling. How do you become one of the “solicited” and why are these people being so mean?

    There are two mains reasons for this vigorous screening. The first is for legal protection. In the past, there have been many artists who have filed suit against labels, claiming that the label ripped off their song. They claim that they sent XYZ Records a demo, and a year later a XYZ Artist released a song that sounded similar to their demo. It gave record companies no choice but to protect themselves by having lawyers or management firms ask for permission to send in a demo on behalf of their clients.

    The second reason is that it helps to make sure the music is targeted. It enables labels to avoid the deluge of inappropriate material that they would receive if they welcomed ALL material. At some point a human being has to go through all the submissions. If the label welcomed unsolicited material, they would be fortunate if 10% of the music sent to them actually fit the style that they were looking for.

  5. Submitting when the label has announced “submissions are closed.” Many services, especially small labels, review websites, and blogs, reach a point where they’re maxed out. They have a small staff and have a backload of submissions and cannot possibly get to any new submissions, at least for the next while. In their submission guidelines there will be a notice that submissions are closed until further notice. Once they get caught up, submissions are opened up again.

  6. Using an incorrect email address. Most music services have several contact emails, especially the larger ones. The email to use depends on your reason for getting in touch. There may be an email address specifically for submissions, reviews, press releases, demos, general questions, and advertising. Make sure you use the appropriate email address.

    If a music reviewer’s personal address is listed, and they ask that you send all submissions to the music@ address, do NOT send your music to their personal address, even if that’s the person that you would like to send your music to.

    It’s likely that the music@ / demos@ / reviews@ messages go to a different account that can handle large files and a lot of incoming emails.

  7. Poor spelling, grammar, and text speak. If you’re a rotten speller, just admit it. Run a spell check or get a friend to look over your copy before you send it to anyone. The same thing goes for grammar. The last thing that a blogger or music reviewer wants to do is to try and plod through a mess of misspelled words and grammatical oddities.

    The same thing goes for text speak. You’re not texting someone, you’re writing a letter of introduction. That age-old rule about the importance of first impressions still applies.

  8. Asking a question that is answered in the FAQ. Most music services have some sort of FAQ on their website – a page that features answers to the most frequently asked questions. They’ll ask in their submission guidelines that you take a moment to read the FAQ before contacting them. The usual policy is, if the FAQ doesn’t answer your question, then by all means get in touch. However, if you send them a question that is answered in the FAQ, you’re only going to tick them off. It’s doubtful that they’ll get back to you.

  9. Not using a required permission forms. Many music services, usually internet radio shows and video broadcasting websites, will not play your music or video unless you fill out their online permission form. In some cases you are asked to print out the form, fill it in, and mail it to them. If you send them your music without the form, it will not be played.

General guidelines

  1. Know what style(s) of music the service welcomes. Nothing slow burns a radio host, music editor, label owner, or blogger like getting bombarded with music that is totally unrelated to the style they promote. It displays a total disrespect. It’s like sitting down and ordering pizza in a Chinese restaurant. It shows them right away that you haven’t taken a moment to even look around to find out about what it is they do. Your songs, of course, are trashed immediately.

  2. Contact before sending your music. Several music services are more than happy to accept your music. All they ask is that you contact them before sending in your music, just to make sure your music is a good fit. It’s for this reason that many services do not post their physical address online. You must contact them first in order to get the mailing address. It’s their way of pre-screening submissions.

  3. Do not contact before sending your music. Some services do not want to be bothered with an initial contact. It’s a waste of their time. They insist that you go ahead and send your music in without any preliminary introduction. Contacting them only irritates them.

  4. Facebook, Twitter. An increasing number of music services prefer to be contacted through their Facebook page or Twitter account. Often you will not find any other contact information on their website other than a link to their Facebook and Twitter pages. Sometimes you will find a contact email within the About section of their Facebook account.

  5. Comments. Many bloggers don’t post any contact information at all. In order to get in touch you have to post a comment on their blog.

  6. Know what formats they accept. This is another key element that is often overlooked. Music services usually post their format of preference. Often it’s a combination of several formats. For instance they may accept digital and physical submissions. Or, they may accept digital submissions only. They may also welcome videos. Or they may be old school and will ask for physical submissions only.

  7. Vinyl only. There is an increase in the number of music services that accept vinyl only. It’s making a bit of a comeback. They are usually record labels in the Punk, Electronic, and Hip Hop genres.

  8. EPs and demos. Many reviewers will accept demos and EPs to review, but MANY DON’T. Again, it’s important to check before sending out your EP or demo.

  9. Time sensitive material. There are a number of music blogs, radio shows, promoters and review sites that will only deal with music that has been released recently. The cutoff date varies, but the allowable time of release is usually six months or less. If your music was released prior to their “cut off” date, it will be ignored.

  10. Local music only. There are a lot of local music resources. Local radio shows, publications, blogs, labels, and more. What is meant by “local” depends on the specific resource. For some it may a particular city and its surrounding suburbs. For another it may be an entire state or province. Local could also include several states, or even a specific section of a state (i.e.: Southern California or Central Ohio). While for others, local can be a whole country.

    A common exception is if your band is on tour and is playing in the community. Often, that qualifies you as “local” even though you’re not from the area.

  11. Which reviewer accepts my style of music? There are a large number of music blog and review websites that have a stable of reviewers. Each reviewer accepts one or more particular styles of music. So, even though the overall website may welcome many styles, the onus is on you to find out which of the reviews/bloggers deals with your particular style of music. Once you determine which reviewer covers your style of music you can contact them according to their specific submission guidelines.

  12. Is this a free or a paid service? Most bloggers, magazines and radio shows will promote your music as a free service. It’s what they love to do. However, more and more services are charging a minimal fee. It’s usually between $10 and $50 depending on the services they offer and the number of songs involved. There are also music services that offer both a “free” and “paid” option. The main advantage of the “paid option” is that it gets you to the front of the line.

  13. Third party submission services. Often a music service will only accept music through a third party submission service. MusicSubmit, Sonicbids, Musicxray, and ReviewShine are the most popular. These submission services act as a protective buffer. Instead of being bombarded by thousands of submissions, many bloggers, reviewers, radio shows, etc. hire a submission service to handle ALL of the incoming submissions. The submission service makes their money by charging the artist a fee for the submission – usually $5 or $10.

  14. Sending a press kit. Another important consideration when sending your music is the accompanying bio information about you or your band. Submission guidelines are usually specific about what sort of information they would like to have included. They could either ask for a full blown press kit, a one-sheet, an electronic press kit (EPK), or just a few lines about you. They may also want a photo, a scan of the album cover, press clippings, and so on. Your best chance to succeed is by sending exactly what it is they want. If they ask for a one-sheet and you send them a novel, you’re only going to frustrate them.

  15. College radio. Some college radio stations allow you to send your music directly to a show’s host, but many insist that all music must be sent to the Music Director. The Music Director then passes on the music to the various shows, according to the genre. Make sure you’re clear on whom to address your music to.

  16. No shrink wrap or glitter. When sending a CD, make sure to remove the shrink wrap first. It’s highly irritating for someone receiving hundreds of CDs a week to continually have to waste valuable time removing annoying shrink wrap. And don’t fill your envelope with glitter to try and be unique and get their attention. It’s universally hated by everyone in the music business.

Digital submissions

  1. Attachments. Nothing fires up the rage-O-meter like receiving an email with a MP3 attached, when the submission guidelines clearly state “Please DO NOT attach MP3s!” These inappropriate submissions tend to clog up their server (and mess with their peace of mind).

  2. Sending MP3s. If a music service does welcome attachments, make sure that you follow their particular specs (if they have them listed). There are a variety of ways to format/compress a MP3. For starters, you always want to make sure that it’s tagged/labeled right. The formatting details vary according to the individual music service.

    Here are examples I’ve taken from different submission guidelines in regard to sending MP3s. If you don’t understand the jargon, a quick trip to Google will clarify everything for you.

    • Please compress your MP3 file to 320 KBPS.

    • MP3 file encoded at 64-512kbps or VBR with 44.1 kHz sampling rate and less than 30 MB.

    • MP3 format, 256 kbit / s, 44.100 KHz

    • We ask that any single MP3s be 128 kbps or better, properly tagged and preferably FCC friendly.

    • Audio files (128kb minimum quality MP3s).

    • Digital promos (WAV or MP3 192 kbps or better quality)

  3. Links to your music. Services that accept digital submissions, but don’t want attachments, will often ask that you send a LINK to your music. MySpace is pretty much history, so they prefer that you send a link to your main website, Facebook page, Bandcamp page, etc.

    Having a link allows the end user to take their time because there are no storage issues. They can casually visit your link whenever they have a moment. If they like your music, they may then ask you to mail in your CD or send them a digital file.

  4. Streaming. For some music services the preferred delivery is via streaming. Streaming is content sent in compressed form over the internet and displayed by the viewer in real time. In other words, they click on a link and the music or video starts to play right away. The end user doesn’t have to wait for the entire file to be transmitted. Streams can be from a YouTube page, Bandcamp page, etc.

  5. Online forms. A lot of music services have set up an online submission form. It allows you to fill out some information about yourself and your band, and it also enables you to upload one or more of your songs to their server.

  6. Soundcloud dropbox. Soundcloud is a highly popular service that enables businesses (and individuals) to accept large numbers of digital files effortlessly. Soundcloud is essentially a GIGANTIC virtual server where music services can park massive numbers of audio and video files without clogging up their hard drive or personal server.

    A Soundcloud dropbox is the file exchange area (you’ll see a Dropbox icon on the web page of many music services). This is where artists can submit their music. It’s kind of like a mailbox for digital files. Once submitted, the file is then parked on the music service’s cloud server where it can be listened to or viewed at their leisure.

  7. File sharing services. Many music services, especially reviewers and bloggers, ask that you send your digital files to them via a file sharing service. A file sharing service is a company that transfers huge files on behalf of their clients. This cloud-enabled transfer allows a music service to download submissions without having to worry about their personal server getting clogged by the endless influx of submissions. Yousendit, Sendspace, Mediafire, WeTransfer, and Rapidshare are some popular file sharing services.

  8. Digital music aggregators. In order to get your music posted on many of the larger digital music websites such as iTunes and Spotify, you must have your music submitted through a digital music aggregator. Aggregators are music services that distribute audio files in bulk to these massive digital websites.

    Aggregators enable theses giant music websites to avoid the technical headaches that would arise from hundreds of thousands of individual artists uploading their music. The aggregator eliminates the need for the technical support that would be required to assist such a large undertaking.

Follow-up

Submission guidelines not only tell you how to make FIRST CONTACT, but more often than not, they also tell you how to follow up (or not). The follow-up can often be as important as the first contact.

The most common rule is that if they like your music, they will get in touch. In other words, “Don’t call us – we’ll call you.” It’s nothing personal, they just don’t have the time to respond to all of the submissions they get. Others may welcome a gentle reminder. Radio show hosts often ask that you follow their playlist to see if your music has been played (instead of contacting them and asking). A lot of places emphasize NO PHONE CALLS!

A sure-fire way to irritate someone is by following up in a way that they specifically asked you not to in their submission guidelines.

Music people are very busy. They are absolutely bombarded with music on a daily basis. It’s a byproduct of doing what they love to do: listening to and discovering new music. They are willing to deal with the deluge because of this incredible passion they have for music. All they ask in return is for you to follow a few simple rules that will make the handling of this incoming flow of music a bit easier.

The best way to have your submission stand out, is by making it personal and by following their submission guidelines to the letter. By doing so, you become part of the minority, and are more likely to be remembered. If you don’t follow the specific submission guidelines, your music faces the inevitable fate of being trashed.

Get Your Music 
Noticed!

Music blogs and more

Retro radio image via ShutterStock.com.

David Wimble is a songwriter, recording artist (with his band Big Meteor), and is the publisher of the Indie Bible, The Indie Venue Bible, and The Indie Bible ONLINE. His company has combined all of their directories into The Ultimate Indie Bundle to create an affordable resource for struggling artists. Email David at david@indiebible.com.

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How To Submit Songs to Music Blogs, Record Labels, Radio, and Press | Area 51 NYC Recording Studios
June 11, 2013 at 9:58 am
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June 13, 2013 at 12:10 pm
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{ 50 comments… read them below or add one }

Fred May June 12, 2013 at 3:37 pm

Excellent advise. Thank you for helping us stay on the straight and narrow with song submissions!

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Shane Martin Oxendine June 13, 2013 at 12:07 pm
Anonymous June 18, 2013 at 1:42 pm

I agree and disagree somewhat. This is what they get paid to do, they’re not volunteering their time to help promote your band. They get paid to write stories, and you’re providing the story. Having this “holier than thou” because I can “make you or break you” attitude is very unprofessional. . . and being professional goes both ways.

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R3kLuSE November 20, 2013 at 6:50 am

Wish you didn’t contradict yourself with posting Anonymously. As I am a Professional Hip Hop Artist and am proud to share my words as Me and only Me. I do support that notion that someone who sits at a desk, answers phones, gets to listen to the hear and souls, the i didn’t get to eat for 3 days making this song kind of submissions. The Your Music gets put in the Trash line is over the line. Procedures Fine. Proper Contact Fine but telling an artist the Artist they need to go get a Masters Degree in Every single one of the Entertainment Companies. Oh then you will have to get the Weekly Company Submission book as they change them when they feel like. Who keeps up with all that UNICEF maybe lol. My point is that same person could be kissing your rear end and getting half their yearly salary because of that trashed music. Stay Chill Quit trying to make everyone stress out over a passion to share good sound. For all artists “DO YOU” Keep it 100 -R3kLuSE New SIngle Available for Purchase and Download Today ♫ Crossing Borders Ft. Tks – @R3kluse. Listen @cdbaby http://bit.ly/1iu3DHN #R3k #hiphop #soul Will be on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Mp3, Last.FM, Tunein radio and all the Main Digital Distributors within the next week. Good Luck all and Let’s Work.

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Chris Moondancer June 18, 2013 at 1:47 pm

As an internet radio host I can’t stress enough the importance of filling out the ID3 tags properly! I get tons of submissions every week and if I don’t know what it is I am not going to play it. I will not remember who you are and I don’t have the time to figure out where this file or that came from so I can fill out the tag for you. Also make sure the file works, believe it or not I get submitted mp3 files that won’t even play. Happens all the time, sometimes even from labels. You want exposure and I want to help with that, but I don’t have time for you if you can’t even make sure your own stuff is in order.

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ChristianBandHelp.com June 18, 2013 at 2:13 pm

Traditionally musicians do not like to play by the rules… but this is one time that being a nonconformist can really hurt. Thanks David for making is really clear that we need to find out what the submission guidelines are and follow them.

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David Wimble June 25, 2013 at 9:35 pm

Well said!

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Jim Marshall June 18, 2013 at 2:27 pm

Very informative Dave.
Your advice is right on!

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Mark Franks June 18, 2013 at 2:27 pm

Thanks so much, David, for this simple invaluable advice for those of us who would love to get our stuff heard and seen by someone… anyone! It’s so easy to forget that, as our music gets funneled further and further down the media pipeline, it will eventually land in someone’s lap who just might pick it up and pay attention to it if we have played our cards right. Thanks for the tips on how we should play those cards so we can stay in the game.

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Travis Hemry June 18, 2013 at 4:13 pm

Very useful information I will keep reading these. Thanks Dave.

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ian bruce June 18, 2013 at 5:59 pm

the number rule of promotion is to have something great to promote.

otherwise u waste time & money & tv watching opportunities.

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Charlene Jones June 18, 2013 at 7:05 pm

Thanks for all the info… It will be my pitching Bible.
Also.. seems like maybe playing submissions might make a good computer show and
maybe a fast way to get properly labeled with name and address,,etc. might
be a fast way for many to hear much music?
Charlene…

Reply

J.B. Hudson June 18, 2013 at 7:57 pm

This is all very true except for one thing,,,,,,,,, you have to know somebody /……That’s right I mean know someone …….Every person that ever made it knew someone that helped them……….They won’t admit it ……I may have someone now helping me,…….. it’s been thirty some years maybe it’s my turn………. J.B. Hudson

Reply

David Wimble June 25, 2013 at 9:25 pm

J.B.

I agree that it helps if you know somebody, but you have to ask yourself … how do they know this person that’s helping them?

Sometimes it will be a friend of a friend or a relative, but I believe most of the time these helpful people come into artist’s lives as a result of hard work.

David

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PLATINUM June 18, 2013 at 8:35 pm

Excellent article. Thanks for the advice!

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Cheryl Pattie June 20, 2013 at 6:13 am

Ive,written songs, and need to place them in the right places, thanks for the Imfo, I always read every thing I have placed infront of my eyes.Like all you send me, send more, we never stop learning. Cheryl Thanks again.

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Lenore Troia June 21, 2013 at 8:43 am

As the music industry changes as fast as the speed of light, this is a most informative article an I thank you for the clarity Dave…yes it is a challenge keeping up and organizing it all, but the road map you have created here is extremely helpful…the only thing I ask and look forward to is an update in a month or so as things will likely change again, and that fast!

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Anonymous June 22, 2013 at 1:20 pm

YES

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Collateral Rebirth July 24, 2013 at 2:09 am

collateral rebirth has released two new tracks from his upcoming new mixtape:FML)do to drop sometimes this summer his latest two tracks titled 7Digits feat. Spike Leek /Hallucination [prod. by Gary Earhole] are really taken the music world by storm but at the sametime Expect the unexpected check out some of his tunes here https://soundcloud.com/collateralrebirth

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JoAnn Bailey August 1, 2013 at 7:03 pm

I agree ..it is all in who you know ..I have followed these steps for yrs. now with no luck ..only a few who expected me to pay them a rediculous amount of money to critique my songs … I sing gospel music both southern and contemp. God has blessed me with the ability to write and sing…I recently released an original cd of my own by using disc makers..The Child of Yesterday .. dedicated to the memory of all the children who left this world too soon! And even after speaking with radio station manager and him promising to air the title tract at least ..when I took him the cd I was told I had to hire a promotor …I told him ,” I have One..His name is God!!!”….This is a Christian radio station too…but that is ok ..it is being played on an AM station locally and get this the only store I could get to sale my cd in is an animal feed store..which is ironic..Mary and Joseph were turned away and Jesus was born in a stable with animals about and our local Christian book and supply store turned me away and the owner of the feed store welcomed me in..not getting rich by no means lol..can hardly keep the lights on but praise God my cd containing His inspired and guided words is touching the lives of others and helping to ease their pain one soul at a time!!! God is so gracious and will open doors!!

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Jim Schmidt August 16, 2013 at 4:19 am

Quit your Whining! Its a new age. You sound like a dinosaur. No wonder record labels are falling fast.
Get to work, check out the creative input coming to you free! or go home. Let somebody else do your job.

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Anonymous September 24, 2013 at 5:15 pm

Right on…..

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John Pape August 28, 2013 at 9:34 am

Great advise on submitting songs. The difference between success and failure is getting the right song in to the right opportunity. Following these guidelines will improve a songwriters chances of getting a song placed.

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Gilles Cormier October 24, 2013 at 9:38 am

Thanks for all the precisions…very practical guidelines

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Dan October 29, 2013 at 11:37 pm

Where can you even find guidelines for submitting on a record labels website? Of course I have never submitted any form of music yet to a record label. But how can you find a guideline? Is it best to always ask to send your track to the company first? Will be doing loads of research before sending any type of track in. Thanks for the advice!

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David Wimble December 23, 2013 at 1:55 am

Dan

It’s important to read the guidelines on the label’s website. They are usually posted, often in the “Contact” section. The way to contact them will vary from label to label. Many are now using Dropboxes. A lot are old school and want a CD mailed to them. And then you have everything in between.

The larger labels, more often than not, will not accept any unsolicited submissions.

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MIke Gambo November 7, 2013 at 6:09 am

Although I agree with 95% of this article, there is one thing we must remember that some labels are just as bad at sucking you in to signing up to their sites with free submissions offer. Then when your in and you want to submit your track, you are forwarded to another page asking for your credit information. It is so frustrating as an artist to find that you jumped all the hoops to get all your info and music ready for upload, to then be redirected to a payment section. That SUCKS TOO! Unfortunately it’s all about making money and the companies offering this type of service have you in their sights. They know your desperate for exposer and success and so the vicious circle goes on and on. Don’t be fooled in thinking they are interested in you, as they have thousands of artists to choose from. Be wise and patient and pick the one’s that at least give you a chance for some small exposure at no expense to you.

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Jizzy November 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm

Thank You David for taking the time to share this info, especially since most bloggers are greedy about there music business knowledge.

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dee November 23, 2013 at 12:28 am

If your music is any good you will be successful. You have to have talent and ambition. If your music sucks it doesn’t matter how many times you submit it to the bloggers, the labels or to the general public; it won’t sell and it won’t make you any money.

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12g41 December 16, 2013 at 2:55 pm
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please check out my friend from new york any comments and feedback is appreciated

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